NEAR NORTH

 

LAKE TEMISKAMING SHORELINE AND REGION

To see the details of the original map sketches, click on the desired section, "Map 1" through "Map 10".

The following are notes by the map's creator.

Lake Temiskaming
Rough Map File

Introduction:

This collection of rough maps forms the basis for a future guide book. I have spent 12 weeks paddling and hiking around Lake Temiskaming, documenting its shores. The St. Johnís School tragedy (June 11, 1978) gave this 100 km long lake an unjustified bad name. Temiskaming is no more dangerous than any other lake of similar size and itís a wonderful adventure for the knowledgeable canoeist, sea kayaker or hiker. The 40 km stretch between McLarens Bay and the Matabitchuan River is essentially wilderness. Much of the lake is, however, threatened by development and hence the urgency for public access to these maps.

Lake Temiskaming, which forms the border with Quebec, was the main transportation route in northeastern Ontario until the railway and roads were constructed. It was a minor fur trade route. Log drivers, prospectors, traders, missionaries, farmers and natives have left a trail of human history strewn along its shores which are often highlighted by 200 to 300 ft. cliffs. Thereís lots of wildlife and big trees and many campsites and lookout trails. The northern 40 km of the lake offers private campgrounds with facilities as well as hotels and restaurants. You can paddle to a gourmet restaurant in Ville-Marie or a waterfront inn in New Liskeard. Maiden Bay Camp, the Mission Resort and Bucke Park cater to canoeists. Iíve used a 16'-0" Arrow Prospector and a 17'-3" Formula Serenity sea kayak to travel Temiskaming.

The Temagami Land Use Plan calls for the development of a hiking trail along the Ontario shoreline and these maps show a rough proposed trail route. For Temagami trails information go to (www.nastawgantrails.com) or (www.ottertooth.com) .

Some campsites are not obvious from out on the lake but if you paddle along the shore and get out and look youíll find them. Many campsites do not have fire pits so be prepared for stove cooking. Campsites also marked with an asterisk are high quality. I have not shown how many tent sites are on a campsite but if your group is no larger than 6 people youíll find enough space. Make sure you have tools for grooming tent sites. Youíll also need a good water filter.

The letter ĎAí indicates Access Point The letter ĎLí indicates Lookout.

There are 10 maps going from #1 at the north end to #10 at the south end where youíll find a dam across the Ottawa River at the town of Temiskaming PQ. Lake Temiskaming is a constantly changing environment and I assume no responsibility for the accuracy of these maps. Use them at your own risk. Be prepared to deal with waves and rocks. Keep in mind that when I began paddling Temiskaming it was mostly unknown to me and I always had to guess and look for everything. Thatís what made it interesting.

Les Wilcox.


If you have any questions regarding these sketches, please contact Les Wilcox at lwilcox@arrowcanoe.com.

For further information about the region including the Temagami area, go to

   
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